Tag Archives: Archaeology

Excavations at Roman Fort: Binchester

Standard

(Larry Hurtado) Recent archaeological work at the Roman site, Vinovia (now known as Binchester, in County Durham (UK) has yielded results include evidence of Christianity.  In particular, findings include a silver ring with an intaglio inset with an anchor and two fish set in a fashion familiar in early Christian art/symbols:

ring[1].

It is interesting to find this sort of evidence in the remains of a military garrison.  The ring is likely from the 4th century CE.  For more information on the site and the archaeological work, see here.

Chester Beatty Papyri: New and Fully Photographed

Standard

I’m delighted to be able now to release news of a truly important project completed:  The completion of the digital photographing of the remarkable cache of ancient papyri housed in the Chester Beatty Library (Dublin).  These papyri include portions of biblical manuscripts that are among the earliest extant, both OT and NT writings, and many other extra-canonical texts as well.

I approached the CBL earlier this year about this, and the CBL Director, Dr. Fionnuala Croke, enthusiastically agreed to take the project forward.  On my recommendation, it was given to Dr. Daniel Wallace and his team in the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts (Dallas, Texas).  You can read his press-release on the CSNTSM here.

“New Documents” Vol 10

Standard

I’ve just received my copy of Volume 10 of the valuable series, New Documents Illustrating Early Christianity, eds. S. R. Llewelyn and J. R. Harrison (Eerdmans, 2012).  For those who don’t know the series, each volume reviews publications of texts and inscriptions from a preceding period of years.  This latest volume covers 1988-1992.

The original publications (typically journal articles) are cited, but the editors/contributors in fact make their own analysis and offer their own comments on the items addressed.  The work represented in these volumes is also invested toward the larger/long-term project of a massive database (with extensive annotations) on all ancient papyri from Egypt pertaining to early Christianity.

The latter project has been the dream of Prof. Edwin Judge, whose energy and vision early on guided the emergence of the Ancient History Documentary Research Centre in Macquarie University (Australia), and the “New Documents” series is based in that Centre (which now forms part of the Ancient Cultures Research Centre in Macquarie).

As with previous volumes in the series, this one covers a wide spectrum of genres and topics, citing recent publications of texts on philosophy, magic, “cult and oracle”, public life, household, “Judaica” and “Christianity,” some 29 component-articles in all, plus indexes of subjects, words (Greek, Latin, Hebrew, Aramaic), ancient authors & works cited, inscriptions, papyri, and texts cited from the Bible, Qumran and Rabbinic works.

For those of us who are not professional epigraphers or palaeographers, but who would like to harvest relevant information on new publications in these fields, this series is a valuable (even unique) tool.    Thanks to all involved!

Another “New Documents” Volume

Standard

(Larry Hurtado):  The latest in the series, “New Documents Illustrating Early Christianity,” produced by the Ancient History Documentary Research Centre in Macquarie University (Sydney, Australia) has appeared, Volume 10, edited by S. R. Llewelyn and J. R. Harrison (published by Eerdmans).  Each volume in the series is a valuable collection of notices of publications on inscriptions, papyri and other artefacts that cast any light on early Christianity and/or its historical setting.  As well, there are typically valuable review-essays that gather up information, providing considered syntheses of matters.  Volume 10 includes sections on “Philosophy”, “Magic”, “Cult and Oracle”, “Public Life:  Caesarian Accession”, “Public Life:  Benefaction and Business”, “Household”, “Judaica”, and “Christianity”, some 29 entries in all.  Recommended!